Platform for Research through the Arts and Sciences

In aging societies people are living longer, raising the likelihood that they will experience disabilities. Disability history is an underutilized source for generating solutions to this societal challenge. DisPLACE (Disability in Public Life and Cultural Expression) is a digital platform for the collection and interpretation of experiences of disability, past and present, by students, researchers, disability service organizations, and the creative industries. The platform includes:

 

1) a digital archive, to share historically-significant documents, images, and multimedia

 

2) an interpretive space, where curators, researchers, and students will engage with these sources to answer research questions about disability history, resulting in online exhibitions, digital documentaries, and scholarly essays, and

 

3) a network zone, facilitating the exchange of information and advice on potential new research questions the hub can be used to answer. This will be the first archive in the Netherlands to gather and analyse a wide range of historical sources on disabilities together, the first shared virtual environment to utilize the cultural heritage of disability to foster and disseminate new scholarly research and creative industry solutions to the challenges of aging societies, and the first to make these accessible online to people with a wide variety of disabilities.

 

The protoype is funded by an NWO Creative Industry – KIEM Grant of €18,000 for the research project ‘Digital Disability Archive’ (1 September 2017 – 31 August 2018), awarded to Manon Parry and collaborating applicants Paul van Trigt (LUIH), Paul Bijl (KITLV), Disability Studies in Nederland, and multimedia partner Driebit.

The project is part of a larger initiative by the BIB Network (Bronnen voor inclusieve burgerschap), working to stimulate the collection and interpretation of disability history.

project link: Neurocultures Research Group

 

Coordinated by Patricia Pisters & Stephan Besser, this research programme within the ASCA is dedicated to the critical and productive study of the rise of the neuro-turn from a humanities perspective. While there have been varying reactions to the neuro turn – some ebullient, some critical – this research group has opted for a specific approach in bringing scholars from different fields together with those working on practical implementations and artists developing their imaginings of what lays ahead of us. In this research group the brain is understood in a broad, non-reductionist sense and approached via a wide range of multi- and cross-disciplinary encounters. They converge in a focus on ‘worldings’ of the brain, i.e. the various ways in which brains are currently placed within and related to worldly contexts in different social, scientific and artistic practices and discourses. This perspective has provided the framework for two international conferences and one symposium that the research group has organized in 2016 and 2017 under the series title Worlding the Brain. Participants in the group include Julian Kiverstein, Machiel Keestra, Patricia Pisters, Stephan Besser, Halbe Kuipers, Flora Lysen, Nim Goede, Moosje Goosen, Dan Leberg, Manon Parry, Tim Yaczo, Joe van Eerden, Dan Oki and others.

link: LGBT heritage project page
 
Queering the Collections is an ongoing networkgroup focused on the importance of preserving and presenting queer history and culture. As many archives and museums strive to become more inclusive institutions with greater relevance for diverse audiences, staff and visitors are encountering new challenges as well as opportunities. Building on similar efforts in the UK and USA, this Netherlands-based project unites people working in museums, archives, libraries, galleries, community organizations, and universities, in a joint effort to collect material culture and oral histories documenting queer life past and present, and to present these collections in partnerships with the public.
 
partners: The Amsterdam Museum, COMCOL